Fundraising for Beginners

Hey guys, I’ve recently run a marathon in aid of some charities, please show your support and give generously 🙂 !

Actually, this is not quite accurate.
The marathon I have run, has been a ‘mental’ one. It took just over two weeks to complete.
I’ve never run a physical marathon, and likelyhood is that I won’t – so I don’t know what it feels like as an experience, but my ‘mental marathon‘ went something like this:
First Week:
Conception of fundraising idea – Really exciting, little bit of apprehension too.
Beginning Training – This involved making some phone calls, research, and deciding on a plan. Suddenly there was lots to consider and lots to do.
Committing to the effort – A few days in, there was no turning back. I was bloody doing it and that was that. In addition, my fundraiser required collaborating with others, so I set about rallying the troops.
Second Week:
Set backs: By the start of the second week, the race was just about to begin, but I got really ill and had to step back for a few days. This was unhelpful, and possibly caused a few unnecessary issues.
Here we go: We are well and truly up and running with this now, its great, I’m loving it and its not that hard after all!
Hang on a sec: I might have spoken too soon, this really isn’t that easy. In fact, can I just stop now? No!? Well okay, I guess I carry on for a bit, but I’m definitely not happy and I want it all to be over soon.
Back on track: God, that first half of the race was tough, but I’m well over half way there now, so I’m sure I can make it after all. Really pleased I kept going, well done me!
The Wall: For me, this came after the plan/race had been 95% completed, apart from the the tiny detail of actually getting other people’s support in the form of donations. I’ll explain what happened when I hit The Wall and how I got over it below… but it was almost complete carnage.
Crossing the Finish Line: This afternoon, I crossed the finish line as far as my involvement with the fundraiser is concerned, and am really proud of myself for the achievement. I’m also completely exhausted, and wondering ever so slightly whether it was all worth it. I think it probably was. I fulfilled my initial goals, as far as was within my control, and it’s been a fantastic journey, and interesting experience.

It’s got me thinking about ‘what makes people support a fundraising attempt?’.
I have always known raising money for charity is not easy. I prefer to be a supporter then a fundraiser usually, as you get to share a little bit of the ‘halo’ and the satisfaction that comes with giving, with very little strenuous work.

I have narrowed it down to a few things that make people successful fundraisers:

  • Immense Physical Challenge by an ordinary adult.
  • Moderate Physical Challenge by an older, younger or physically/mentally disabled or ill person.
  • A challenge undertaken by a well-liked individual or celebrity.
  • A challenge undertaken by a (preferably large) group of people working together.
  • A challenge undertaken by someone experiencing hardship, such as life-threatening illness or bereavement.
  • Something very funny, cute, lovable, or ludicrous that is unexpected.
  • Extraordinary acts of kindness, particularly in difficult times, or by people who themselves are also in need of support.

There might be some I’ve missed. I’ve decided that I don’t really fit any of the criteria for being a fundraiser whom people feel very motivated to support, which makes things a bit more difficult in some ways.
I certainly don’t fit the first column of fundraisers.
My mental illness IS life-threatening in it’s very worst form, but not many people would know that or truly understand why it should be.
The fundraiser wasn’t funny or cute – it was simply an attempt to share, as widely as possible, a bit of joy in nature – beautiful gardens, woodlands and animals, by organising the production of a video-experience… to compensate for a normally ‘in person’ experience that would have helped raise quite a lot of money for charity, were people able to leave their homes at present.

Donations are trickling in now, slower then I would’ve hoped – but I am very impatient. I am also having to constantly remind myself that my entire self-worth is not dependant on whether or not people donate. I have done what I set out to do.

The Wall
I promised an explanation of this.
Well, I have an unfortunate tendency to sometimes put myself under extraordinary pressure to perform to exaggerated levels, without regard to my present state of health or capability. This is bad enough. What’s worse is that I often unconciously transfer those high expectations to others that are close to me, at exactly the same time that I am getting extremely overwrought myself.
The person that bore the brunt of my inevitable fury when these unreasonable expectations were not instantly fulfilled was my sister, who did very little wrong, but received a tsunami of emotional outpouring from me, as well as some pretty harsh criticism for what was only a very minor slip up on her part.
It could’ve been a lot worse and we are back on good terms again after a bit of reflection and discussion on both sides. I am more able then I used to be to see my unreasonable behaviour for what it is, partly controllable and partly a mental disorder. This means I can try and warn a few key people, or stop myself before it gets too late. There’s still work to be done on this though, and still time. Not drinking alcohol whilst dealing with my problems helps a lot though.

To sum up:
I won’t know for a while whether the fundraising effort was financially successful. It has been a great achievement though, especially after a long period of ill health. Its also been a learning experience, and it’s given me something to get involved with – even if at points the involvement has been too intense.
I am awarding myself a metaphorical medal for my work, and a very big thumbs for giving it a go, and dragging myself over the finish line.

Thanks for reading, I guess this is a gratitude post in some ways – but am not really sure where to file it!

T.G.L

(the Grateful Landlady)

Plant Babies

They’re so cute!

Here’s whats happening with my seeds so far:

Nasturtium tray – 5/20
Mini ‘Satellite-dish’ leaf structure

I’ve been ill all weekend. However, nature continues without me, which is great. The nasturtium seeds are coming on well, as seen above.
Very little to report on the ornamental gourd seeds. No signs of life as yet, and I haven’t grown them before, so I am beginning to get excited as to how they will present themselves, when and if they finally do!

If successful, the ornamental gourd plants could be trained to look something like this:
(not my garden)

Incredible and beautiful gourdi-ness!

Mine will not look like that as I don’t have space for an arch! But we shall see, – I have some plans to ‘train’ them in a minor, less ostentatious, fashion.

Succulents

These babies have been ignored for almost 2 years now. Back then, before I got really depressed, I had started cultivating the shoots of a few succulents that I had, and getting them started as plants in their own right.
Then I ‘switched off’ and abandoned them, but remarkably, here they still are; ready and waiting for a bit of opportunity to arise for them to flourish.

Again, I have plans for them, but am not entirely sure yet how these plans will pan out.

I’ll try hard not to run out on the plant babies again though.
I am looking forward to watching them all develop and grow up!

T.G.L

(the Grateful Landlady)

Easter, in a time of Coronavirus

I am Celebrating in Isolation!

Until last month, I had been suffering from a major and drawn out ‘episode’ of severe depression.
Episode seems too short a descriptive. It was like a box set, that just went on and on and on, with each season bringing absolutely no change and nothing new.

Consequently, celebrating has not been on the agenda, however much a small voice inside has begged and pleaded to know why the indefinable ‘magic’ of the universe and being alive, just wasn’t there anymore for me.

Persuading myself to go outside in spring/summer?
No enjoyment of seasons at all.
Finished a gruelling task? Emotionally … nothing, zip. No satisfaction whatsoever.
Birthdays? Nothing. Apart from more disappointment that I am older still, and still ill.
Easter? I did not even notice it last year – did it happen?
Christmas? For two years, it just didn’t come ‘feeling-wise’ for me.
Btw I actually really love Christmas, and am normally a person who feels the ‘magic’ building from Autumn on. I love the songs, movies, wrapping presents, trees and foliage, and all the decorations!

My spirits lifted quite quickly at the end of February, and I have been tentatively stepping forward since then. Trying to make progress, but not too fast. Fast is dangerous for me, as I can swing from depressed to manic, which then becomes very intense for everyone else.

Easter 2020

This weekend has been a bit of marker in my recovery. The follow events are the big milestones that happened.

  1. On Good Friday, I handed over my rental property to new tenants and that has gone very smoothly so far. They seem lovely, and also capable.
  2. In the last week, I have been slowly reconnecting with the friends from whom I have basically been ‘distancing’ myself from since I fell ill. We had a group Zoom call on Saturday, which was really fun, and has also left me with a kind of warm fuzzy feeling that is still present. I think its called ‘re-connection’!
  3. On Easter Sunday, I spent a few hours being ‘crafty’. Painting eggs for an Easter tree is something my sister and I used to do as kids, and only occasionally since. It has been ‘work’, but overall incredibly satisfying as its creative, produces an end result, sense of achievement and also is very festive. My home feels cosy, loved, and very Easter-y.

I am not sure of my plans for Easter Monday, but, I can guarantee I will be Staying at Home. Probably taking it easy and pottering around the house and garden. Watching a bit of TV or a film maybe. Or reading stuff on WordPress, and (a limited amount of) scrolling on social media.

All I can say, again, is how incredibly grateful I am for everything.
All the above events, my friends, my family, my houses, my cat, the technology that connects people at this strange time, and of course my returning health.

My heart feels very full of love and happiness this Easter. I would like to ‘beam’ this love out to everyone I know and anyone reading, especially those that may be in need of it!

T.G.L

(the Grateful Landlady)